Santa Paula Adult Day Services becoming a reality

November 12, 2004
Santa Paula News

A two-year effort has been successful and now the Santa Paula Adult Day Services is getting ready to start a program that offers qualified professional services for impaired seniors and peace of mind to families and caregivers who need respite.

By Peggy KellySanta Paula TimesA two-year effort has been successful and now the Santa Paula Adult Day Services is getting ready to start a program that offers qualified professional services for impaired seniors and peace of mind to families and caregivers who need respite.Santa Clara Valley Hospice Board President Cathy Barringer discussed the plans for the center at the October Good Morning Santa Paula!Limoneira Company hosted the Chamber of Commerce sponsored event at Logsdon’s at the Santa Paula Airport.“In our home garden there is a plaque that reads ‘Planting a garden is believing in the future.’ I believe so for Santa Paula Memorial Hospital and also for our work these last years, to see if there was interest and support for this dream and vision. It hasn’t been an easy trail,” noted Barringer.A “substantial amount” of initial funding was approved by Hospice directors, followed by the awarding of generous grant to the startup program.The next step was finalizing an agreement with The Aging Connection: “We have the dream and the vision and they have the expertise and experience,” said Barringer.Evie Greene and Sue Lindeman of The Aging Connection noted that the partnership is exciting and that “Not only do we have a purpose but a passion for this program,” reflecting their work over a decade with the cognitively or physically impaired.The program will be open to adults 18 years and older who will be served in an environment of “safety, warmth and dignity,” said Greene. “We’ll also provide much needed respite for their families.”
Studies have shown that the cost to businesses as a result of employee caregiving responsibilities is estimated at more than $29 billion annually. But the impact of caregiving goes far beyond the financial: loss of sleep, depression and physical exhaustion is just a few of the symptoms faced by caregivers.Greene noted that statistics have shown that caregivers die prematurely due to stress and tension.“We will provide a day off for them,” she noted.With the rise of Alzheimer’s and other illnesses, almost one-quarter of American households provide care for relatives or friends age 50 or older.In addition, providing a daycare program prevents long-term nursing home care for the patient.The center will charge on a sliding scale and no one will be turned away because of an inability to pay.Lindeman said that the programs will be individualized to the clients needs and can include discussion groups, arts and crafts and games to help sharpen minds under the direction of trained staff and volunteers who will ensure that activities address physical, social, emotional, cognitive and spiritual needs of participants.



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